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Hi All,

I had my 1997 Cherokee in the shop for a water pump replacement. I also mentioned that I thought the brakes were having an issue. When I picked up my car the mechanic (a very good guy) said that the brakes were fine but that the wheel cylinder was leaking badly and soaking the brake pads. This was what was causing the braking problem. He gave me prices for replacing the cylinder, brake shoes and pads. The parts themselves seems inexpensive so my question is whether this might be something I could do myself? I'm not afraid to tackle things like this but I'm no serious mechanic. If this is something I could handle does anyone know of any good build docs (with pictures, etc)?

Many thanks in advance
Kai
 

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I did this on my 89 back when i owned it. Its a really simple install, only 2 bolts holding the cylinder and then the brake line. The trick is to get the disc brake parts back together onto the cylinder and adjust the brakes. Just take pics of how it goes together before you take it apart or pick yourself up a haynes or pics that I am sure someone on here can post up.
 

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I did the brakes on my 90 it was pretty easy I did one side at a time so I could go back and look at the assembled brake the cylinder was 9.00 dollars and lifetime shoes were under 30.00(auto zone) and a can of brake clean
 

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X2 Its real simple. I get at least 3 in our shop a week and it takes about 20 mins to do minus bleeding them after (usually we flush the system). Just ask questions if your stumped. Also get this tool. Its a life saver.

All parts stores carry them for like 10-15 bucks.
 

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I did this on my 89 back when i owned it. Its a really simple install, only 2 bolts holding the cylinder and then the brake line. The trick is to get the disc brake parts back together onto the cylinder and adjust the brakes. Just take pics of how it goes together before you take it apart or pick yourself up a haynes or pics that I am sure someone on here can post up.
:agree:

Soak the brake fitting that goes into the wheel cylinder on the back side with PB blaster a couple days before. They are known to seize and if they do, you will end up replacing the whole line plus wheel cylinder. It's a easy job though.

You can google "bleeding brakes" and find numerous write-ups on how to bleed your brakes after you've replaced the wheel cylinder. (a required step)
 

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It's pretty easy and straight-forwards as everyone has been saying. I replaced both rear cylinders when I upgraded the fronts to EBC's and I'd never messed with brakes before. An alternative to taking a picture is just pull both rear wheels off, that way you have the proper way it should look when re-assembled.
 

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It's pretty easy and straight-forwards as everyone has been saying. I replaced both rear cylinders when I upgraded the fronts to EBC's and I'd never messed with brakes before. An alternative to taking a picture is just pull both rear wheels off, that way you have the proper way it should look when re-assembled.
Agreed, but, I gotta rat on a dear departed best buddy.

He pulled both drums and proceeded to mount both sets of shoes backwards.

Instead of remembering that the shoes on one side are "opposite" the other side, he did the first side with the same shoe orientation as the example side, then remembered they needed to be "opposed" and did the second side with the same shoe orientation as the incorrect side.

The result: terrible rear brakes when driving forward and instant lockups when backing up.

Fortunately, he called me before he drove it very far and I showed him the correct layout in an old Chilton's manual. This is a good time for an old Polaroid instant pic camera . . . .

Budd
 

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When I do drums I like to do one side at a time without even tearing down the other side. I do agree that the picture idea is great, but sometimes they're too small, you don't get everything, etc. If you do one side at a time you'll always be to refer to the other side.
 

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When I do drums I like to do one side at a time without even tearing down the other side. I do agree that the picture idea is great, but sometimes they're too small, you don't get everything, etc. If you do one side at a time you'll always be to refer to the other side.
I'll scan a page from my manual and stick in here tomorrow while I'm waiting for spackling to dry.

Then it can be printed out 8 1/2 X11.

Budd

Update:

Guys, I can't find my Haynes or my Chilton manuals. I was going to get a scan from one of them, but ....

Sorry.

BC
 

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Update No. 2:

Gee, I found my manuals hidden in a remote corner of my workshop. I think they knew they were going under the "lamp" and were hiding out.

Here ya go. I suggest printing them out on letter size paper. I also put them in my album in my profile page.

Budd
 

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This is so great. Thanks for all the responses. I'm going to give it a shot this weekend and I'll keep everyone posted on how it goes (including lots of pictures for next time).
 

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if u do a lot of mudding then dont be afraid to be a little rough with them... mine was packed full to the top of mud on both sides... dont forget to get yours rotors resurfaced while your their
 
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