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Short Bus Motorsports
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OK guys we all have some sort of skid or want some. What skids do you think are the most important, and the best and worst out there.
 

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well I think the front skid if your not superlifted its very important, also the Tcase one too, the gas tank one well some people overlook it but if you have to replace a gas tank, well you will want one then, also at least for me (its not a skid) but a splash guard for the alternator :D
 

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Gas Tank
Transfer Case
Oil Pan
Rocker skids

Not in any particular order.

Now of course i have to add some pictures since i am a picture freak:

I have this transfer case skid:
http://appalachianarmor.com/products/xj-np231-tc-skid-plate.htm



I'm running Rusty's to protect my jeep's blood supply:

http://rustysoffroad.com/mm5/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=rustys&Product_Code=RA-JS11-XJ&Category_Code=xj_skid




This isn't neccessary but i run the stock front skid to pretty it up:



There are mixed suggestions for using oil pan skids. Some say it's not needed and some say it is. I think it's a necessary skid to have because I dented my TJ's oil pan a few times and hit my xj's pan on a drop off the first time out. I rather have it protected instead of risking the loss of oil. You just never know. If a stick can find it's way through the firewall of that JK, then i'm sure there's a chance of poking the oil pan.


:hi:
 

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oil pan is a huge one, as well as gas tank, tc, and one that is over looked is a trans pan skid
none of which i have, still gots to build em
 

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On the '92,I gots me factory oil and gas skid plates...
I'm eyeballing a T/C one...

The '98 ain't got nuttin. So needless to say I'm eyeballing all that too...
 

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hey mud do those skids bother you in the oil changes?
 

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if my undercarriage is bare (no protection).can someone breakdown what i need to enforce the entire underneath with description if you have time and costs.how many different sections of skids and what are they all called
 

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and installation difficulty,or possible costs at local 4x4 shop where i get good deals on labor hrs
 

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hey mud do those skids bother you in the oil changes?
Nope. Just four bolts and it pops off in like 4 minutes and 38 seconds. :) I was gonna order one of those fram oil drain extenders but decided to just remove it when needed. Not a big chore. I only change my oil once or twice a year.
 

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if my undercarriage is bare (no protection).can someone breakdown what i need to enforce the entire underneath with description if you have time and costs.how many different sections of skids and what are they all called
If you check out my pictures, i show three skids. The ones i do not show are the gas tank skid and rocker skids. Gas tank skid goes on the gas tank, rocker skids protect your rocker panel below the doors.

Most of these skids are bolt-on. It's just too easy to let a shop do it for you. You just unbolt, install skid, and put bolts back. The oil pan skid (rusty's) requires you to remove the lower control arm bolts (one at a time) but that's pretty simple too. Front skid plate, that protects your steering components, requires removing the bumper and that's just a few bolts and one hose (20 min job). The skid goes on and then bumper is bolted back on. The transfer case skid bolts on using self-tapping bolts that are included. You pre-drill the holes slightly smaller than the bolts and then bolt it on. Gas tank skid bolts to the framerail nutsert. There's a long piece of metal with nuts welded to it, inside the framerail and the skid plate bolts to this on both sides. Rocker panels usually bolt to the framerail and lip of the body that hangs below the door. Some holes are drilled, some are already there.

That's about it. All you would need is a drill, drill bits, socket set, locktight, and jack stands (optional) to get more space under there. Some skids require painting to whatever color you like.

I wouldn't know about labor and all that because i did all this myself and never actually seen anyone take theirs to a shop to have skids installed.

HTH
 

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Skids in order that I added them:
- Dana 30 Warn Diff Skid
- Skid Row Tcase Skid
- AJ's HD Rock Sliders
- Rock-It Dana 35 Diff Slider
- Rusty's Engine/Tranny Skid
- Solid Dana 30 Diff Cover (replaced Warn Diff Skid)
- Nth Degree Dana 44 Skid/Slider (replaced Rock-It Slider for Dana 44)

I think the most important are: Tcase Skid/Engine-Tranny (tied for 1st), Rock Sliders, Dana 30 protection, Gas Tank Skid, Rear Axle Protection

I don't have a skid on my gas tank, yet. It is in the works, just haven't gotten the funds together for it as I have had other things come up that needed attention first. In all honesty, I am very concious that it is unprotected, yet as hard as I've wheeled it I've never landed on it. Most of the time that I'm coming off of something, my hitch catches the rear and almost seems to lift the rear of the XJ (gas tank) off whatever obstacle is there - this is mainly one reason I haven't added the gas tank skid yet (YES, I know it's not a good reason).

The Warn Diff Skid has been great, and can really take a beating. I highly recommend it for protection. The only thing I don't like about it is that you have to deal with a diff cover AND a diff skid when servicing the diffs. Also, I'm not a fan of the allen-head bolts that are provided with the skid, but those can always be swapped out for regular bolts.

The Rustys Engine/Tranny skid was a nightmare to install. NOTHING lined up what-so-ever (and no my body wasn't all that tweaked when I put this skid on). It has held up pretty good to the beatings I've put it through, especially when I was just on a budget boost. It's going to need replacing soon because it's really bent now, will probably consider either making my own or going with Skid Row. I did this skid later on mainly due to lack of funds to purchase it. I did have some close calls with the oil pan, so I do recommend getting some protection up there early on.

The Skid Row Tcase Skid was a breeze to install, and would definately use it again. I have cracked it though, but it has served me very well.

AJ's Rock Sliders have been outstanding. I HIGHLY recommend putting these on before you do any harder wheeling because you run the risk of messing up your pinch seams and rockers, which will in turn make installation of these a complete PITA. I opted to weld mine onto the framerails and pinch seams partially because the rockers/pinch seams were so messed up that the bolts wouldn't bolt up well, and because I felt that this would provide more rigidity to everything.

The Rock-It Diff Sliders are good, but do break easily at the mounting points that go over the pinion. They do a good job of not letting your diff get hung up on stuff. I replaced the Rock-It's with the Nth Degree because I liked the design better because it was flush with the bottom of the diff, and actually protects more of the pinion/bottom of the driveshaft than the Rock-It's do.

The Solid Diff Covers I got during their recent sale and just really couldn't pass them up.
 

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Here's my experience with skidplates. Keep in mind I have hit, scratched, and gouged them all (except one) and a few I have dented or bent. Those I haven't used I'll tell you why.

Moving front to back
Dana 30 diff guard: essential if you wheel anywhere near rocks.
Transmission skid: I had the Tomken skid and had to redo the mounts so it would fit. This is the only skid I had on but did not hit. I took it off because it was pretty much worthless and would have bent up anyway.
Transfer Case skid: essential. Had Rusty's for several years and it did the job. Now I have the T&T Treks belly pan which not only covers the t-case but the rear portion of the transmission as well. This skid is better built and offers more coverage.
Rock Rails: Had Rocky Road step rails but bent them up. Reinforced them and used for another year or two. Then I cut my rockers out up to the door sills and welded in 2x6 rectangular tubing. Rocker protection is always a good thing.
Gas Tank skid: Good to have. My Tomken skid might not be the best one out there but it does the job.
rear diff guard: I didn't think I'd hit this as much but surprisingly I do. It also helps the cover from getting peeled back.

What I don't have:
Front skidplate: not much use, especially after you are lifted. If anything it would just get in the way of working on the front end.
Engine skid: I don't see much use for this either. After you are lifted, the oil pan is up high and behind the axle. Pretty hard to hit that, and I never have.
 

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Nope. Just four bolts and it pops off in like 4 minutes and 38 seconds. :) I was gonna order one of those fram oil drain extenders but decided to just remove it when needed. Not a big chore. I only change my oil once or twice a year.
FYI: Those oil drain extenders from Fram suck ass. You'll be there for a hour waiting for the oil to drain thru one of them...
 

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I saw some skids for the rear diff in the past, but I don't think the one I really like they sell anymore. Anyone run a rear diff skid? Got a link?
 

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cool thanks alot.......ill start installing the skids one at a time.
 

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I saw some skids for the rear diff in the past, but I don't think the one I really like they sell anymore. Anyone run a rear diff skid? Got a link?
Diff skids and diff guards (like mine) are rather old-school. Now it seems HD diff covers are more popular and for good reason. The problem is not many companies make them for the 8.25. I know at least one company does but the name escapes me.
 
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