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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
:hi: As it's cooling off in the mornings here in Idaho, i'm considering the notion of changing my Thermostat. I would like to run my engine AND heater just a little bit hotter.

I'm very confused about how Thermostats "work". :brickwall:

Would a "colder" temperature thermostat cause an engine to run hotter? Do they open and close more often, causing the engine to run warmer and at a more consistent temperature?

Would a "hotter" temperature thermostat cause an engine to run cooler? Do they open and close less often, causing the coolant to get colder in the radiator, before it recycles back into the engine?

Or, do i have this concept totally backwards? :dunno:
 

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I tried running with out one once and it still overheated. I have always had the best luck with the stock type stat.

Fuel injected vehicles are designed to run at a specific temperature, and to achieve that the engineers specify a 195* thermostat. People sometimes change to a lower temp t-stat to alleviate an overheating issue. Or because they can't fix the problem the correct way, and are trying the "cheap fix". But this doesn't take care of the problem.
The t-stat keeps coolant in the engine to draw heat away from it until it reaches 195* then opens, allowing the coolant to travel to the radiator to be cooled before traveling back to the engine. After the engine cools down the t-stat closes stopping the flow. This also keeps the coolant in the radiator longer to be cooled by the air flowing through it. If you install a lower temp. t-stat it will hardly ever close, and this in turn won't allow the coolant to remain in the radiator long enough to sufficiently be cooled before returning to the engine, and the temp keeps rising.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I tried running with out one once and it still overheated. I have always had the best luck with the stock type stat.

Fuel injected vehicles are designed to run at a specific temperature, and to achieve that the engineers specify a 195* thermostat. People sometimes change to a lower temp t-stat to alleviate an overheating issue. Or because they can't fix the problem the correct way, and are trying the "cheap fix". But this doesn't take care of the problem.
The t-stat keeps coolant in the engine to draw heat away from it until it reaches 195* then opens, allowing the coolant to travel to the radiator to be cooled before traveling back to the engine. After the engine cools down the t-stat closes stopping the flow. This also keeps the coolant in the radiator longer to be cooled by the air flowing through it. If you install a lower temp. t-stat it will hardly ever close, and this in turn won't allow the coolant to remain in the radiator long enough to sufficiently be cooled before returning to the engine, and the temp keeps rising.
Thanks for clearing this up, a 195* t-stat will remain then! I will now check into other reasons as to why my heater isn't melting my "sneakers"! :rock:
 

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the higher the temp on the thermostat the hotter it gets before it opens, but first i would check the blower on the right side under the windshield wiper fluid reservoir and make sure its sealed good.
 
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