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just tighten till you cannot tighten anymore
 

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Torque specs:

Item .........................……......Torque Ft. lbs. .............. Nm

Lug nuts (1/2 X 20 w/ 60* cone) .... 85-115 .............. 115-150
All tie rod ends .....................…..... 55 ...................….. 74
Steering (both ends) ..............…..... 55 ................….... 74
Shock absorber upper nut .............. 16 ................….... 22
Shock absorber lower nuts ............. 17 ................….... 23
UCA frame end .....................…...... 66 ..............…..... 89
UCA axle end .........................….... 55 ................….... 74
LCA frame end ......................…..... 85 ...................... 115
LCA axle end .........................….... 85 ...................... 115
Track bar frame end ..............…..... 60 .................…... 81
Track bar axle end .................….... 40 ..................…... 54
Track bar bracket bolts ..........…..... 92 ...................... 125
Track bar bracket nut .............….... 74 ....................... 100
Track bar bracket support bolts ...... 31 ....................... 42
Hub bolts (3) ............................…. 75 ....................... 102
Hub- axle bolt ..........................….. 175 ..................... 237
 

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Torque specs from FSM on my site - if I don't have your year, it's because I either don't have that FSM yet, or have the electronic version and haven't perused it. Pick the year next to yours with the same body style, you'll be close.

For suspension, you definitely do want to use torque specs (particularly on anything with a bushing,) tighten it "at rest" and not up in the air, and use LocTite on the threads (242 or equivalent would be best.)
 

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If I remember correctly, the front leaf bolt is 115 and rear is 85. U-bolts were like 60 something ft lbs but I never trusted that and always went with 80 and locktight.

I just checked my Haynes, it says:

Front and Rear mounting bolts (leaf) 109 ft lbs
Tie Plate U-bolt nuts Cherokee: 52 , Commache 82

Again i don't trust that 52 ft lbs.

I have my book here so if you need any other specs, just list it here and i'll post it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
thanks mudd, what about rear brake line bolts, or do i just tighten all the way down? how much for lug nutlike 115? just curious, also what about rear shocks are they the same as the ones up above a few posts?
 

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thanks mudd, what about rear brake line bolts, or do i just tighten all the way down? how much for lug nutlike 115? just curious, also what about rear shocks are they the same as the ones up above a few posts?
I'm not sure about brake lines. I dunno how you measure torque on a line that requires a open end wrench.

Lug nut torque is listed in the first post, first of all the specs.

Lug nuts (1/2 X 20 w/ 60* cone) .... 85-115 .............. 115-150

But the haynes manual says 75 ft lbs. My tj's manual said 85-115. I use 100 ft lbs.

My manual doesn't list specs for the shocks. I use anti-sieze on the bolts and tighten them snug. I never felt the need to torque em down. You could use what's listed in my first post of specs. Upper nuts are the rear upper nuts, lower nuts are the front lower nuts. No need to torque the stud end of the front shock or the lower rear shock mount. Tighten those till the bushing is snug and tight.
 

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For hydraulic lines, torque specs are typically listed in "flats past finger tight."

Meaning - you turn the nut/fitting until it's "finger tight" (no wrench - just your fingers,) and then you turn it the specified number of 1/6-turns past that using a wrench.

As I recall (I'd have to look) the general rules are:

to 1/4" - 1FPFT (one-sixth turn)
5/16"-3/8" - 2FPFT (one-third turn)
7/16"-1/2" - 3FPFT (one-half turn)
9/16"-1" - 4FPFT (two-thirds turn)
1-1/8"+ - 6FPFT (one full turn)

This may then be gradually adjusted upwards if leaks are noted after final assembly (visually verify presence/absence of leaks before returning vehicle/equipment to service. Apply pressure to verify.)
 

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For hydraulic lines, torque specs are typically listed in "flats past finger tight."

Meaning - you turn the nut/fitting until it's "finger tight" (no wrench - just your fingers,) and then you turn it the specified number of 1/6-turns past that using a wrench.

As I recall (I'd have to look) the general rules are:

to 1/4" - 1FPFT (one-sixth turn)
5/16"-3/8" - 2FPFT (one-third turn)
7/16"-1/2" - 3FPFT (one-half turn)
9/16"-1" - 4FPFT (two-thirds turn)
1-1/8"+ - 6FPFT (one full turn)

This may then be gradually adjusted upwards if leaks are noted after final assembly (visually verify presence/absence of leaks before returning vehicle/equipment to service. Apply pressure to verify.)
Thanks for this info. I learned something. :)
 

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Thanks for this info. I learned something. :)
Anytime.

NB: Sealant is not used on any "two-part" hydraulic fitting, either. Flared tubing, SAE flare, "bubble" flare, -AN, -JIC - if it doesn't seal, the fitting needs to be replaced. Period.

That's why there are tightening specs for hydraulic fittings as well, and they're the "torque angle" method instead of the "torque work" (pound-feet) method. Torque angle is generally a more accurate way to get a good torque value, and it's coming up more and more in engine work as well.
 

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lol i learned something too- its time that i go around and re-torque all my bolts in the suspension. theyve had about 3000 miles on them since install
 
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