Jeep Cherokee Talk banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The title here pretty much describes it.

My next upgrade after Fog Light install is most likely to be a high quality T Case Skid Plate, so why not also have it for the Cat all in one package too?... ...Some T Case Skid Plates do not include covering the Cat.

The IRO Transfer Case/Catalytic Converter Skid Plate for the WJ seems to be a good price-bang for the buck.

Any thoughts or comparisons to other aftermarket Transfer Case/Catalytic Converter Skid Plates for WJ's will be appreciated.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,720 Posts
If it's just your t-case you're worried about, why not go with the OEM skid?


about $200 cheaper...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
RE:
If it's just your t-case you're worried about, why not go with the OEM skid?
An OEM T Case Skid is not really what I was asking about.
Any thoughts or comparisons to other aftermarket Transfer Case/Catalytic Converter Skid Plates for WJ's will be appreciated.
Besides protection for the T Case, I am also looking for protection for the Catalytic Converter from being destroyed from things like protruding rocks, roots, or whatever else.

Just like repairing or replacing the T Case, it is also costly to replace the cat, particularly here in CA where the cat has to be CARB Compliant to pass Emissions Test for Registration Renewal. The price for a CARB Compliant rear cat ranges well above $450 just for the cat, then it has to be welded in. There may be some core/recycle value-discount from a muffler shop that could make the welding cost less, but still would cost more than the IRO Skid Plate.

Anyway, I like the strength and durability of the IRO. It seems to me to be well worth the price in the long-run.

Besides that, the OEM T Case skid looks to be more of a placebo for protection from much vehicle weight making hard contact with rocks than a real guard against them, IMO... ...Particularly when loaded to near GVWR when Overlanding, which is what kind of 4-Wheeling I will be doing the most of.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,720 Posts
RE:

An OEM T Case Skid is not really what I was asking about.


Besides protection for the T Case, I am also looking for protection for the Catalytic Converter from being destroyed from things like protruding rocks, roots, or whatever else.

Just like repairing or replacing the T Case, it is also costly to replace the cat, particularly here in CA where the cat has to be CARB Compliant to pass Emissions Test for Registration Renewal. The price for a CARB Compliant rear cat ranges well above $450 just for the cat, then it has to be welded in. There may be some core/recycle value-discount from a muffler shop that could make the welding cost less, but still would cost more than the IRO Skid Plate.

Anyway, I like the strength and durability of the IRO. It seems to me to be well worth the price in the long-run.
It your hard earned scrilla, bub. Get what you want, for your the one that is working for it....

I get it. I was just wondering why the OEM didn't make any sense for you. In my ZJ, the cat is high enough to not have to worry about it. Perhaps the WJ's are in a lower position, IDK. Is there any structurealy rigidity to be gained by adding this IRO skid? WJ's are unibody right? That could be a slight bonus in the lifespan of your rig.

I suppose it would be what your definition of overlanding is, or at least the environment your in. Where I am, we rarely have to worry about anything sticking out enough to even touch the cat. Overlanding is the majority of what I do out here, and some high mountain passes: most of which are just really bumpy two tracks.

Sometimes, money saved equals money for other parts, additions, or gear.


Besides that, the OEM T Case skid looks to be more of a placebo for protection from much vehicle weight making hard contact with rocks than a real guard against them, IMO... ...Particularly when loaded to near GVWR when Overlanding, which is what kind of 4-Wheeling I will be doing the most of.
How big is your lift?

I am at 4.5" and I have not really hit anything, although I am very OCD about my rear aluminum diff whilst out wheeling. I really need to get a skid plate for it, so I don't have to worry anymore...

Also, You may want to look at JCR, and see what they may have for you. They usually have some stout stuff.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank for your input DaingMaing.

You did remind me of the fact that my WJ also has the aluminum case Dana 44 Diff, so now I am wondering, and not knowing which is going to be the most likely to happen, either a potentially damaging hit; the T Case/Cat, or to the Diff?... ...Hmm... ...That could be another topic I might post some questions about.

...I guess, ultimately, it depends on what kind of terrain I am mostly going to encounter and how I navigate it.

Here in CA, there is just about every type of terrain that the any of the other Lower 48 states would have. There is terrain that varies allot, like the Rubicon Trail in the Sierras and then there are long stretches of relatively flat, wash-boarded desert roads and dry lake-beads and just about everything between the 2 extremes. I have no plans or desire for doing any real 'Rock Crawling' with my WJ.

I plan on going on trips that would probably qualify for being called "Overlanding" and have gone on weeks-long 2wd trips with modified Mini-RV, doing Dispersed Camping and much Dry Camping on Public Lands. I have done those mostly in National Forrest and Bureau of Land Management lands, and also, sometimes, one of my all-time favorite places to trip around: Death Valley.

When going on weeks long trips like that, I favor going in the winter to get away from the rainy part of winter in my area. I like going to South West Desert areas, usually the Mojave Desert, mostly in CA and sometimes AZ. There are many washouts and frequent encounters with sand which was sometimes too deep for me to want to go any further.

Many, of the places I have been have potentially damaging embedded, protruding, or loose rocks and sometimes, in the Forest there are large tree roots or, more commonly, big chunks of wood or large rocks that someone used to fill the rut or ditch.

However, that being said, I live near the Mendocino National Forest, which has some mixed OHV/4x4 'trails', and many so-called 'Jeep Trails'. Many of them have deep drainage cuts across the steep sections that were put there by the forest service to minimize erosion. It's very likely for making contact with the crest of those cuts with center of 4x4 at Breakover. Even with a moderate lift it is very likely to happen.

Speaking of Lift, to answer your question:
How big is your lift?
My WJ, as far as I can tell, has no lift on the suspension. It does have a very minimal height above stock because of the the 31" tires on the stock 16" wheels.

My thinking on the Skid Plate is that, because I won't be able to afford a quality lift any time soon, I might as well be prepared for the 'inevitable'. Also, The Skid Plate, (or whatever upgrade/s) should be something that can be of good use after the 'quality' lift.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top