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Anyone do any welding? If I were to get into fabrication of say, a winch bumper. What type welder would I need?
 

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A 220v MIG or TIG welder. Anything smaller wouldn't have the power to get a good penetration on the steel. 110v welders are great for sheetmetal/body work, but when you wanna go beefy, a 220v is the only way to go.
 

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^^Agreed,but if your starting off I would go with a MIG because it is more user friendly than a TIG.
 

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DEFINATELY go with MIG, but make sure it's running gas, not that flux-core crap. It's good for a temp fix, but a gas welder is the way to go to make it permanent. I've been welding for years, and I can barely do TIG on steel, and when it comes to aluminum, forget it. I blow holes in that faster than anything. Gas MIG welding is like a new .45 ...Just point and shoot. :rofl:
 

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I prefer to TIG everything, but I MIG'd my bumpers.
 

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I'll just X 15 it (or what ever number we're up to)
220 MIG would be the best to start with. You don't want to get something that won't do all that you want it to, then have to buy another welder later. Get a good name brand Miller, Hobart, Lincoln... Watch out and don't get one with a low duty cycle.... 75% or higher on the max setting would be the lowest I'd go.

And as was said go ahead and get gas, not flux core.

One of the best things to do is to take a welding class through a community college or tech school. Many have evening classes. This will teach you the basics and give you some experience on different welders. And sometimes get you a student discount at the welding shop when you go in to buy your welder.

A huge plus is to spend the coin to get an auto darkening helmet. Makes learning much easier, and welding in general.


That's about all, for now anyway...​
 

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You can get cheap auto darkening helmets too... A place we have in the land of ice and snow, called princess auto, sells what I consider to be a pretty decent auto helmet for about $60 when it's on sale... I have two.

And yeah, 220V MIG. Don't bother with a TIG - yet...
 

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Apparently ignorance is bliss because I'm quite happy with my little Lincoln 135 running .030" flux (it came with all the hookups for gas, I just haven't invested in a tank yet). Does 1/4" no problem and plugs in anywhere.
 

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I have the same Lincoln 135. It works well for thin material or if you have a good bevel and work slow. I have built both my bumpers with it but they are .120 wall. Jason get some gas on that thing. No splatter and lays a reasonable bead if you don't over heat it.
 

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I've welded all my stuff with a Lincoln 135. Everything from sheet metal to 1/4". But its not a 220 so I must have done something wrong.
 

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I've welded all my stuff with a Lincoln 135. Everything from sheet metal to 1/4". But its not a 220 so I must have done something wrong.
i have the same welder. i am running flux in it right now until i get the gas setup i want after x-mas
i have been welding my iron scorpion winch bumper together with it and its penetrating fine. thats 1/4 and 3/16 i dont think you would want to go bigger but if you do go with a 220

o yeah i got mine on craigslist for 250. a whole lot cheaper than a 220 mig
 

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When people say a 110 welder doesn't penetrate enough, they don't realize you can bevel the edge and get 100% penetration into the joint. And as long as you have good technique and know what a proper weld should be like, you can do anything with a 110 welder.

That being said, a 220 would be nice for the increased duty cycle.
 

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I think both 110 and 220 have thier advantages and disadvantages.

110 can be used most everywhere. can be used on the trail run by a light generator.

220 is good for heavier steel. it's not as mobel, but it can make a beginner look like a pro on thier welds. they penatrate the steel better than a 110. a 220 also needs a breaker box in the garage that can handle the amps it pulls.


flux core is better for outside and trail use. or steel thats hard to get clean. also good for in tight places where you can't get the gun into for the shielding gas to work. down side to flux, the beed is harder to make look good and makes more of a mess to clean up. more slag that needs to ground down or filed off.

i use a hobart 140. if you get a 110 welder, go with a high amp good brand. i think 140 is as big as hobart goes in a 110. i think hobart 187 is the smallest 220 they have. i think. i bought the 110 because i need something thats more mobel.
the only thing on my xj build i'm going to use a 220 for is the building of my lower control arms. when welding steel to an axle, be careful not to over heat it. that goes with any steel being welded. unless it's heavy steel, a long hot bead can warp the steel.

ok, thats my 2 cents from the new guy. oh, i was thought to weld about a year ago. another good tool, a cutting torch or plasma cutter. :rock:
 
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